Always two there are, no more no less. A master and an apprentice.

So I’m quoting Yoda. Does that make me a Star Wars geek? I guess maybe, but I’m really not, I just dig his quirky  little backward way of talking and his intonation. His sayings are clever and provocative. They make you smile just as you say them.  Star Wars has  a significant place in pop culture and I can respect that, for sure.yoda

I am forever the apprentice, never the master, particularly as it relates to Bryan. Recently I had a conversation with a case worker that assists in navigating benefits at work. This man is an Occupational Therapist by education and practice, but he is also a trusted advisor to me. I have been speaking with this man, approximately 2-3 times per year for the last 7 years. He knows all about Bryan, his challenges, his needs and his progress. Another example, for sure, that it truly takes a village to raise a kid with autism. So this man helps me to navigate the available benefits and based on our discussions and his probing, we talk about what Bryan may or may not need for the upcoming year and he translates that into credible recommendations for assistance. One of the benefits of this benefit (ha!) is that this man really tries to understand who Bryan is, although they have not and will not meet, and tries to understand my philosophy in parenting Bryan. He can gauge progress by asking pointed questions the answers which reveal  growth or deficiencies. He forces me to not only think about what we are focusing on now, but the 3-5 year look ahead. Both are necessary and practical, yet stir emotions. Bryan will be 17 this month (there must be a math error) and it’s exciting to see what he can do now and where he can go. So I was describing to this man all of the independent functioning Bryan is doing and all of the great things he can do at home, at school etc. However, and this is the great part, there is always more. Always more to be done, always more to implement, always more to learn. He made two great suggestions. He knows Bryan is very visual, as are many kids on the spectrum, and I told him that Bryan likes a written schedule and also loves his phone and ipad. He suggested we add all of his plans on a google calendar. Duh, I use it all of the time, why didn’t I think of that??? Bryan will love that. So easy, so simple, yet so smart.

Another thing he and I talked about was Bryan’s use of money. At school he has personal finance aka math and he loves it. My caseworker suggested getting Bryan a prepaid debit card so he could pay for things and learn how to use the debit/credit machines. Another fantastic idea, all geared toward independence. My most favorite thing about talking to people who work with or are parents of kids on the spectrum are just these little tidbits we can share. It’s never the big things; we don’t miss those, but those small incremental wins are so fruitful. The student, grasshopper, apprentice in me is awakened by these suggestions and now I’m focused again on the possibilities. Bryan came home from school a few weeks ago and told me he is now going to FAU on Thursdays, “with the big kids”. He was very proud of himself and I knew based on his sense of urgency that the school told  him to make sure he told me. It’s not the rate of progress that matters, only the direction. So much behind us, yet so far ahead. Two weeks we went to Disney, a request by Bryan in celebration of his upcoming birthday. I like Disney but have been there many many times (incidental benefit of Florida residency) and he used to have tremendous anxiety there, even though he loves it. He was not anxious at all. He was over the moon. Jason and I shared a few quick “look how happy he is” moments when observing Bryan. So we decided to go on the Speedway at the Magic Kingdom. You know, those seriously old cars on a metal track. Jason went on his own and I went with Bryan. In my head I really wanted to see how he could navigate the car. He was fine with the driving part, as I knew he would be, but he was so distracted by people; nope not ready for real driving  yet. Years ago I would have panicked that this means he won’t be able to drive. Now I know it just means he will not be driving anytime soon because he’s not mature enough to focus on the road without the distractions. Bryan’s sheer presence reminds me that there is always plenty to learn if you are willing to be a student.

 

Plug it out!

bellsLanguage deficits are extremely frustrating, not only for the person trying to express themselves but for the listener. Over the years I have learned to speak Bryan and interpret many of his sayings for their real meaning. Some cute funny things are like this: Bryan always empties the dishwasher. In the middle of emptying it he will say, “there’s a lot of dishwasher.” This means the dishwasher was very full and had a lot of dishes. Or he comes up with silly stuff, like instead of unplug he says “plug it out”. Or he will get some things backwards. He will say to my dad “you’re my grandson” and then we correct him and he says, “I’m your grandson.” All in there, just not always the way you expect it to be. Mostly a good thing.

The hardest thing for many kids with autism, and Bryan in particular, is the exchange that takes place in conversation. One person asks a question and the other person answers. Very very basic, but this essential structure of conversation was what led me to the conclusion something was wrong in the first place. Go back to when Bryan was almost 3 and I took him to the zoo with a friend. He knew the sounds the animals made, but did not truly engage. My friend and her son, a few months younger than Bryan, were having conversation. He was asking questions and answering questions. Not Bryan. Driving home in the car I asked him if he liked the elephant or the tiger and he said nothing. No answer at all. Hmm. As time progressed and tons, I mean tons of speech and language therapy which he still gets today, he started to answer some questions. It was fairly easy to get a who question answered or a where answered. I think for Bryan those were just easier questions because he knew people’s names and heard us often talk about places we were going and these questions don’t require the same level of thinking to answer.  It also taught me that when you ask him something, or talk to him, you cannot assume he knows the meaning of the word. I had to remind myself that you need to give him the definition of the word  because the nuance or the gist of it is not picked up. Still need to do this today. It really makes you think about how much language is actually learned by inference and not definition. As a parent or sibling it’s something that always has to be in your mind if you want to effectively communicate with your ASD kid.

The key to learning for Bryan is allowing him the time to process. It all comes bubbling up if you give it time. However, a huge thing has now started to happen. Like most Bryan things, it is something that just started happening and I say to myself, wow, this is enormous. So here is the thing; getting an answer to the ‘why’ question has always eluded us. It is so frustrating and so challenging, particularly when trying to get to the root cause of some unexpected behavioral issue. For example, he will get upset at school and pinch someone or kick the desk. If you ask him, why did you get upset at school. He will say “because I pinched so and so.” I will say “No Bryan, that’s what you did after you got upset, but what caused you to get upset, why were you upset”. And he will say ” because I hurt so and so” or “because I had a bad moment”. UGH come on you’re killing me. You know the answer but you can’t tell me. He’s 16 and this has always been the one critical piece missing in having meaningful conversation.

Bryan answered a why question!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Now I know you may think I’m cookoo, but it really is beyond huge. It has only happened over the last 10 days and not consistently, but still!! Bryan loves videos, movies, and music. He particularly still loves Thomas the Tank Engine. It is juvenile, but the tank engines have very expressive faces and the videos often deal with the tank engine’s emotions and their interaction. Thomas videos have been regarding as instructional for face recognition and therefore a good tool for little kids with autism. I will not let him listen to Sesame Street or Barney (and thankfully this does not come up anymore) but Thomas is a different story. We do the voices together in the car and he tells me all about the engines and what’s going on. So a few times recently he has told me that one of the engines was upset. I asked him “why was the engine upset”. I was not testing him, I was really just driving and making conversation. He said “he was upset because he was sick and making black smoke”. I paused a second, realizing the enormity of this and decided to probe a bit more and said “why was the engine making black smoke?” and he said “because he ran over some dirty rocks and it got in his engine”. OMG he answered two why questions perfectly. I seriously choked back tears. I said “Bryan you answered why questions, yay” As I speak Bryan, Bryan speaks Mommy. He said, ” I love you so much” which is his standard answer for anything that he does not know the answer I’m looking for but knows I am very happy. Now I know we are not splitting the atom here, but by my standards, we might as well be. To give you a sense of the enormity I couldn’t wait to tell Bryan’s speech therapist. She teared up and said, “we’ve been working on this for years.” It truly takes a village, I’ll tell you that.

So, I am not going to say this is happening all of the time, but it has happened and the more he exercises this “muscle” the more it will happen. I’ve waited so long to get this type of answer but I knew someday it would come. 

 

 

 

 

Own it.

IMG_1415 (1)You know who you are. You people who have contacted me by all forms of media to let me know I’m not alone, I’m going to be ok and “this too shall pass.” This is not a thank you blog, this is an awareness blog; my awareness. One thing about me is that I know who I am and what I need to function. I need support and warmth, love and friendship. I needed to reach out to the collective in order to get out of my own head. I am grateful and humbled by the responses I received, but, what is also great is that it rattled my cage a bit and got me back on track. Enough of the pity party and sadness. Typically I am all action, what can I do next, how will I solve this one? I didn’t have that feeling this time so I’m glad it’s returning. I was more irritated, annoyed, frustrated. I kept thinking, oh finally we send him to a school for kids with autism and now he’s having an issue? How naive of me, duh! The sheer fact that the school is for kids with autism should have revealed to me just how hard it would be for him, how he would need to really up his game. And how amateurish of me to think just because it’s for kids with autism, that automatically means it’s right for Bryan. Every now and then a good kick in the ass is needed for this Mommy. However, I’m happy to report that I am evolving. I am thinking about how to help him day-to-day and how to help him in the event this doesn’t work out. It never is a let’s just try this or that type of thing with autism. Can’t just up the meds and think it will all be ok. Things need to be examined from multiple points of view, physically, emotionally, psychologically, etc. I also like to get perspective from different people on things. Bryan’s Dad and I have brainstormed and we try to be of one mind. Bryan needs some sort of reward based system, some changed meds, and some behavioral consequences. He also needs to understand that you don’t have to like school, but you do have to get control of your body and yourself. Sounds kind of obvious, but typically it’s the obvious stuff that really is not obvious. Autism. What’s easy is hard and what’s hard is easy. Take him for blood work and he doesn’t move, model patient. Take him to the supermarket and all hell breaks loose. Everyone is focused on the triggers, why do you think he’s upset? Why do you think he’s behaving like this? It’s logical to try to find the root cause, but logic went out the window 10 years ago. Not sure if the triggers even matter. What truly matters, in my opinion, is how to prevent escalation. How to give him the tools to get himself under control. No one can control life’s triggers, but everyone needs to learn how to cope with whatever comes their way. I mean we all have to deal with crap and we don’t always know why something upsets us, but we do learn, when something does, what is the best way to handle it. For Bryan, all of this is in slow motion and needs to be treated carefully and with unconditional love.

I do always like to get Jason’s take on things. I asked him if he had any thoughts as to why Bryan was having such a tough time adjusting. I asked him because he knows Bryan very well and because he spends the most time with Bryan. He asked if Bryan had been bullied at school. I let him know I didn’t think so because it didn’t seem like the issues were with other kids.  I asked if he thought the school might be too hard for Bryan, like maybe Bryan wasn’t high functioning enough. Jason said, “what do you mean high functioning, is that like a little less autism?” Hmm I guess so. Good news Bryan’s cognitive skills were not at issue here.

The lesson for me is patience. Not patience for Bryan per se, but patience with the tempo of life. Patience to see if the changes we are making take hold and patience to find something else if this doesn’t work out.