Love is Love is Love

IMG_0384 (1).JPGI do not make New Year’s Resolutions, I make hourly resolutions. I couldn’t possibly store up all of my potential improvements to force them out in a year end blast. My journey is iterative and I’m forever fine tuning the workload. At this point there is also a collision between resolutions and  bucket list items. Kind of what do I need to do vs. what do I want to do, etc. Good news is it’s my set of lists and I can manage it any way that fits. So although I do not make New Year’s Resolutions, I do try to take a pause to appreciate my life and the people in it at this time of year. So this  year I am going to focus on love. When I watched Lin-Manuel Miranda give his Tony speech right after the Orlando shooting, he said “love is love is love….” in reference to the respect for the people who are homosexual and were victimized by the gunman. It is a great reminder and his speech really touched me. It was a rough, emotion-filled speech/sonnet fueled by his need to acknowledge the Tony he was receiving  and yet his compulsion, his pure heart, that couldn’t pass up the forum to comment on the most recent tragedy. Something about his delivery, his body language really struck me; this man feels his words, he just doesn’t say them. It was almost as if he was holding back the words but they had to escape from his brain via his mouth. Do I have that much passion about anything? Hmm, kids maybe. I actually think my main passion at this point in my life is to try. I just want to try at being better at everything. The only way for me to achieve this is to work on what is most important, the priority, my love relationships; to which I am proud to say I have plenty. So here are some of the ones that are most precious to me and my recognition for their significance in my life and my desire to enhance them.

Sibling Love: If you have a sibling and you are lucky enough to love them and feel love in return, you get it. This person who shares the unique joint perspective of growing up in the same home and watching parents and family members influence your development, there is such a crazy bond that a quick glance over dinner can say it all. I am proud to say that the shitty relationship my sister and I had growing up, the constant fighting and comparisons have been left in our childhood home and the mutual respect and fun we share now makes up for it all. Sharing the burden of our aging parents has solidified the bond even more. Fortunately we understand our individual and collective roles in the process. My sister, luckily, like me, finds humor in the humorless. We could write a book with optional titles such as “laughing at your life when you should be crying”, “Things you never thought you would hear or should hear coming from one of your parent’s mouths”, and “Who am I and how did I get here?” As far as sibling love goes, I cannot even do justice to the sibling love between my boys. They adore each other; their relationship is very complicated, yet not. Bryan may be older by 2 years and 8 months, but chronology is not a significant player in their situation. Jason has always been a very caring and loving brother. Often other people remark about how good he is with Bryan, how helpful he is, etc.  To Jason, Bryan is just Bryan, his one and only sibling, and there since his birth. I would not say I take it for granted, because that would be untrue, but if you truly know Jason at all, it’s just who he is. His level of empathy and compassion for people, not just Bryan,  is just as much a signature trait of his, as autism is for Bryan. It’s hard coded in and that’s that. And like all sibling relationships there is ebb and flow in their bond and growing pains both literally and figuratively.

Parental Love: So you know the love I feel from my mom has changed dramatically over the last few years. I no longer have the ability to call her multiple times each day just to share something funny or get some advice. I no longer have that confidant who always had my back and thought I was the jammy jam. My mom was so reasonable and so thoughtful in her advice and she had many close long term friends who also feel the void. In later years she really helped me navigate tricky waters between my dad and my ex husband and ultimately was very supportive when I began to speak with her about my ailing marriage. She was a homemaker and not a career woman in any way and we talked about how different our lives  were and we agreed we each were programmed so differently that we could not walk each other’s path through life. My mother respected me as a woman, mother and business person. What propels me now when I see her is this need to be even better because I don’t have her to talk to. I want to show her, or really me, that I can be a “big girl” and handle things. In order for me to move forward I need to have personal goals; some very tangible and achievable and some more esoteric which manifest on the fly. Either way, I want my Mom’s legacy, for me, to be that I am that girl she loved and respected. I need to earn my way. With my Dad it’s become such an interesting change. I was always daddy’s girl and he looked at me with love and pride since childhood. Over the years there have been tons of bumps and bruises but now we are on a steady course, banded together over decisions for my mom  and forging ahead with his new and uncertain life.

Mommy love: Is there anything so great? Before you have a kid you hear about this gripping bond people feel for their children. You think it must be something special but you cannot truly conceive of it. The little angel appears and you think, “oh so this is what they were talking about!!!” Take my heart, melt it over and over again. And then when it was time for another, you think can I really love another one just as much? Yep you can and you do. My boys are my joy, my focus, my reason, my why. Their triumphs are mine and their challenges, well yep get those too. ‘Nuf said.

Bryan/Autism love: The kid knows how to work the fan club. He is a one man PR specialist for autism awareness. He loves to love and reaches out on a daily basis to friends, family, teachers, therapists, counselors, etc via facebook, facetime etc. I am truly fascinated and beyond appreciative of the warm reception he receives most of the time. Whenever talking to the recipient of these daily calls, etc. they feel special, as if contact from him is directed only at them. Who does not want to talk to someone who makes them feel special? Autism, however, is still so challenging, imagine having someone in your home who literally cannot stop talking or repeating and at the same time is so anxious the minute they sense you are not happy with them and what they are talking about. It’s the ultimate test for Jason and me on a daily basis. But somehow Bryan’s sweet goofiness, his silly inappropriate behavior more often than not forces a chuckle between us and we forge ahead. When meeting my cousins a few days ago for lunch,  I was so happy with the way they celebrated his silliness and made him feel just like he was “one of the kids”. We have tons of friends near and far that are cheering for him. No real words suffice.

Friend love: I am truly beyond lucky to have wonderful lifelong friends. My bestie  is a lifer and she is my touchstone for all things. My close inner circle of female friends are a combo of coaches, partners in crime and sisters from other misters. My close friends are not limited to women, however, I have some incomparable male friends that I adore. Some of my friends live nearby but often they are in NY, solidifying my need for quarterly visits up north. Over my years in Florida, I have made many new friends that have started out either as “autism parents” that morphed into real friends or “work colleagues” that have also become warm, true friends. What I value besides the loyalty and trustworthiness of my friends is the variety. Some friends are more advice givers, some are more just buddies for happy hour. Either way, I love observing human nature and understanding the different dynamics.  I am a very social person and I enjoy hearing other’s life stories. At this point in my life we have all lived a while and no one is without some sort of challenge, lesson, or funny anecdote which I find very captivating.

Cousins/extended family love: If you know me personally, you know my cousins are not cousins they are brothers/sisters, nephews and nieces. One of the main attractions for living in Florida was the proximity to this crazy clan and you just have to see my face when I’m with them. The depth of these relationships is personified through unending teasing, laughter and appreciation. If you go to one of our events and you left your thick skin home, well sorry Charlie, you are screwed. The need to laugh at yourself through the eyes of those you love is a great lesson. It is so freeing to know you can be yourself with a large group of people who will take you down and build you up inside of any group gathering. The link between us and our kids is one of the best parts of my life and although I tell them all of the time how much I love them, they know just by my body language displayed at any event.

Pet love: This one should be quick. Furry creatures make me happy. A curl up on the couch with a yummy dog or cat is therapeutic and warm. I love my animals, they are family and they make our lives better.

Romantic love: It is always a necessary part of life for me. I am a very affectionate person and I would like to say I have fallen in love since my divorce. I have not. I have fallen in like once or twice which is electrifying!  I have found some connections and have had fun along the way. I have learned that I am still capable of having great romantic feelings and that feels awesome. I believe real love is out there for me and I will not settle or fail to take risks to find it. No pain, no gain. Simple but true. I am totally willing to be in the game for the better of team me.

Happy 2017!

 

Good Feelings Gone

nemoYou know that scene in Finding Nemo where Marlin and Dory are swimming and are feeling happy. On their quest to find Nemo they encounter various sea creatures and obstacles, but at this moment happiness abounds.  They are circling around and gently gliding along, as if all was right with the world. They feel encapsulated with a careless warmth. They are oblivious to the scary big fish luring them in with his magical soft light. The fish goes in for the kill and Dory shouts “good feelings gone!” Just like that they are now swimming for their lives, dodging the scary fish and hoping to escape. I get this feeling sometimes like things are moving along really well, work is going well, boys are doing well and I’m doing well emotionally, physically and spiritually, and then something or someone will crank up the buzzkill and all goodness will collapse into air.

Working at the place I do, which is fabulous, December is over the top. We are rewarded financially and valued beyond comprehension for our efforts. The shot of financial and thankful adrenaline propels us to a great start for the new year. I was able to share with my kids and express to them the ever important lesson of hard work reaps great benefits. I think they are now at an age and a mental capacity to not only understand this literally but feel it in their hearts. Last weekend I went on a super fun excursion to the Bahamas. I had looked forward to going and except for less than stellar weather, it surely didn’t disappoint. I am always trying to find the lesson; for the boys they are obvious, basic growing up lessons, for me, to appreciate what I have, to live life with fun and joy and focus on what are truly the sweetest parts of life.

However, and of course there is always a however or a but, the tough reality of my responsibility load is never too far in the shadows. Of course I never really escape my responsibilities, but a pina colada at a gorgeous resort can somehow stay them for a while. Over the years there have been many reality jolts that have sent me into a downward spiral; a work issue, a Bryan issue, etc. The squeaky floorboard of an issue could not be silenced and essentially my whole house would collapse over it. At this point in my life’s journey I am no longer demolishing the house over a squeaky floorboard or a shorted outlet. My skin is thicker, tougher and experience is the quintessential professor. Last night I got home after a very challenging day at work. I needed to process what had occurred and figure out the best way to remove any emotional feelings from what happened and apply logic and said experience. The only way for me to do this, is to distract myself enough so that my head clears of the problem for re focus at a later time. Clarity for me requires emotional distance and at least at this point in my life, I know it. I decided to have a conversation with the boys about a short vacation over Xmas week. Inasmuch as we had two trips this year, to DC and LA, I am not in the position to do anything crazy, and I do want to take them to Europe next year, so I just was looking for a little getaway. Well, here’s what I learned. Autism is alive and well in my home. We talked about Busch Gardens, Captiva, Marco Island, Vero, etc. We talked about Orlando, the Keys, Miami Beach, Ft. Lauderdale Beach, staycation stuff etc. Bryan flipped out. He is great with transitioning if he knows the plan. This abstract, what if, why, how, discussion that Jason and I were having, including visuals on my open laptop, just stressed him to the max. His anxiety level was so amped up that it was visual and palpable. The power struggle between the boys heated up and a physical skirmish ensued. So as the Mom, who is now way smaller than either of these two testosterone filled teenage boys, I kind of need to get out of the way or I’m going to end up across the room. But since I am the authority, police, dictator (no it’s not a democracy in my house), I had to call to order. A few slammed doors later everyone was in their own corner and I was able to sit down and figure out what the heck just happened. I was grappling between, damn these two spoiled kids can’t agree on a vacation, wah wah wah, and hmm, maybe I allowed for too much speculation, too much input to make this easy. I then had to visit the prisoners to sort out the damage. Bryan is way better now at self soothing and while he couldn’t stop expressing his remorse and his anxiety, the physical control now present is critical to my survival. Jason is trickier to navigate since he gets me more and took the zero and fessed up a fairly heartfelt apology. At this point, I’m done, toast, spent. Went upstairs took a hot bath and crawled into bed. Today is a new day and I’m ready for it.

What does the J stand for?

I go to see my Mom in her new place on the weekends. Yesterday, Bryan and I went on our way to his usual speech therapy and social group. We planned a regular visit which is about 20-30 minutes. I typically like to take her for a walk. She doesn’t talk much and mostly I feel like Shecky Greene doing a monologue (if you are too young to know who that is google it) but I try to get her out in the fresh air and talk about what’s going on in our lives. The bad news is she doesn’t remember what I tell her, the good news I can tell her the same things over and over and she doesn’t get bored. Ok, I know that’s really not funny, but humor is my way of coping and at this point, nothing about this is funny so I have to make a joke out of it. We sat down outside at a table and Bryan was looking at his phone. I wear a “J” initial necklace and my mom said to me, “what does the J stand for?”. I said “Jane” and there was nothing but an “oh, ok” from my Mom. I had to look away. I felt that hot feeling come over me, and no not a hot flash, but that feeling like when you are holding back tears and/or vomit. I thought for sure she might say something like “my daughter’s name is Jane or right”. I don’t care for the expression “the new normal” but somehow it’s fitting. We left not too long after and I didn’t cry when we left. I took Bryan to his speech therapy and sat in the car for a few minutes reflecting. How does the brain  retain so much info and then slowly lose it all. Fortunately, for now she still recognizes me when I come to see her. She doesn’t know that I’m her daughter, but she does know she knows me. She is always excited to see us; at least for now. The strange thing in all of this is even though she does not recall details, like my name or how I am related to her, she does know that I belong to her. Last week when I was there we sat on a bench and we flipped the pages of People magazine.She likes to look at the photos and it does help give me some things to say to her. We notice the fashion and the ads. She looked at me and said “we love each other”. I smiled but again my eyes filled with tears; much happier tears. When I leave her and  I’m alone I always break down. She is doing well, but the reality that she is not ever coming home still gets me each time.

When I go now it reminds of a time when Bryan could not really make a sentence or have true conversation. I remember when we were still living in NY and I took him alone out to dinner. His inability to make an exchange, even in a small sentence, was a big trigger for me to know he was not a typical child. Ironically my mom is now very similar to that small Bryan. I guess the best lesson is that it doesn’t matter whether they can answer back as long as they know they are loved.

 

Go Team!

img_0241The similarities between the approach I’ve taken to Alzheimer’s and my mom to Autism and Bryan are becoming more obvious. It’s interesting to me how much one good methodology can be applied to multiple situations. For years I have been saying that you need to harness the collective when it comes to raising a child with autism. As the mom of one of these kids, you need to realize you are the quarterback of an amazing team of people, family, therapists,friends and other parents. These people each have their individual skills, but getting them to work together, in the way that works best for your kid, you need to have a sense of both the near and far. You need to call the plays because at the end of the day, you know your kid better than anyone. Over the years we have adjusted the playbook, taken on some new players, and retired a few for the best interest of team Bryan.

My mom’s placement in the Alzheimer’s home came as a team effort too. We did our research but in the end the recommendation came from a friend whose father had been there. She is a warm and trustworthy person so we knew we were in good hands. The adjustment has been difficult for all of us; however she seems much better so that is what counts. My dad has been going to the support groups that the home sponsors. He is learning to share with others how he is feeling about my mom’s placement and learning  that by hearing other family’s stories and their pain, he will not only feel a sense of comradeship but will also get some relief. There is a safety, a warmth in belonging to a group. Identifying with those similarly situated is incredibly uplifting. I have noticed when I go to see my mom that  I see the same family members and we have started to know each other. We all say hello and have empathy for our mutual plight. Today I got to the home about 10:30 and two of the family members were in the entry way. They were telling me that they had seen my mom and how sweet and cute she is. I told one lady that yesterday her husband said hello to me and gave me a big smile. I walked in having that familiar feeling of community. While I know my mom will not get better, and that is always lurking in my psyche, I do know she is doing as well as can be expected. The boys feel it too. Last weekend I took the boys to see her after we had breakfast with my dad and sister, our new Sunday morning ritual. My dad is terribly lonesome and the early mornings when he is alone in his house typically sting. Usually when we walk out of my mom’s place I get about two steps from the front door and start to sob. I am ok when I see her, but leaving her in a place that is not her home is quite disturbing. The boys had been very affectionate with her that day and I didn’t feel so sad when we walked out. Jason turned to me and said “Mom, you’re doing so much better with Grandma”. Ok well so much for doing better because his tenderness made me sob in a different way. I knew they were impacted by emotions, but had not felt it so directly. We are experiencing this change all together and learning how to support each other, go team!

The hits just keep on coming

IMG_3302I know I have said before that Autism sucks. Well it doesn’t, at least not really or by comparison to Alzheimer’s. Alzheimer’s really sucks and takes suckage to a whole new level.  If you know us and/or if you are a regular reader of my blog (thanks by the way) you know that my mom has Alzheimer’s Disease. I was familiar with this joyful disease when my Nana  had it in the 80s. But, she was my grandmother, didn’t take great care of herself, it was in a different era, blah blah blah. My mom has it and we are now making some changes in our family for survival purposes; her survival and my father’s survival.

My parents never told me important things when I was growing up. There was always a lot of shushing and Yiddish when anything went down. You knew something was up but you only found out much later on what occurred. I do not subscribe to that philosophy. I think age appropriate descriptions of what is going on in your life affords your kids the opportunity to grow and learn and deal. On Friday we were able to place my mom into a Memory Care Facility for Alzheimer’s patients aka nursing home for people with the disease. The decision to do this was ultimately my Dad’s since it is his wife, but as a family we are all mindful of what is best for my mom and my dad. I’m proud of the tenderness and understanding we have shown each other during this time.

So I need to tell my boys what is happening. Bryan and Jason are so close to my folks and they have watched the transformation of their highly engaged grandmother to this tiny childlike woman. I feel not only grief-stricken for my dad, my sister and me and our close extended family,  but for my boys. The difference in her is obvious and while they do not cry, since she is still around, they have mentioned many times the change and ultimate deterioration of her mind. I was a little tentative to share with them; we are still WAY grieving the loss of my aunt. The nights are the worst; it seems that the nights have a way of playing with you. I’m sleeping briefly and then waking up to, did this shit really go down? Is my Aunt gone? Where is my mommy? I always get off topic! Ok so I decided to talk to the boys over dinner on Thursday night. I had mentioned to them previously that Grandpa, Aunt Frannie and I were going to take Grandma to a place to live, but that now was the time and it was going to happen the next day. Jason asked the typical questions, where is the place? will we be able to see her? does she know? how is Grandpa doing? (that last one, I am proud to say, is who Jason is, ever concerned about the casualties). Bryan did his typical Bryan giggle which happens when things are awkward.We talked through what I knew and what I would find out. I was very very emotional that night. I literally could not reel it in. I reassured them I was ok but since I don’t  hide things I know they felt bad. I guess on some level they needed to see that I was grieving.

Later in the evening I went to see Bryan in his room. He was just resting and I was teary. It kind of went like this:

Me: Bryan do you understand what I told you about Grandma?

Bryan: Is Grandma sick?

Me: Yes sort of, her brain is sick.

Bryan: Is Grandma going to die?

Me: Everyone eventually dies, but she is not going to die now. She is just going to live in a place that is safer for her, where they can take care of her.

Bryan: Are Grandma and Grandpa getting divorced? (can you say sucker punch to the gut on that one?)

Me: No honey, it’s just that Grandma has  brain disease and Grandpa can’t take care of her anymore with it. She needs special care.

Bryan: She’s going to the hospital? She’ll be home soon.

Me: No, she’s not coming home.

At that point, I had to stop and tell him we will talk more tomorrow. I literally got so overwhelmed with being overwhelmed I knew it was better to take a pause. He was very tired so he went to sleep.

I, of course, was not able to sleep at all after that. How do you explain to your kid with autism something that while intellectually you know but can’t really explain to yourself? What really kept me awake, however, was that I didn’t have the language I needed to give him. Bryan talks to so many people, calls, FaceTimes, etc and I want him to “get it right” so people won’t be worried or confused about what he is telling them. I could not find the words and truthfully still cannot. I was completely dumbfounded. I know this might sound a bit melodramatic, but I wanted him to understand and to represent appropriately. I guess I am my mother’s daughter because she was so proud and private, I want to make sure she is not embarrassed and can retain some sort of atmospheric dignity. So crazy, she will not know, but I guess I will know and that is the point. A few days have passed and we have been getting some typical reports from the facility. I still do not have the words for Bryan nor for me.

 

 

 

 

 

Tempus Fugit

IMG_3295So many things going on in my brain right now that I feel compelled to write. This week has been filled with so many emotions and while I know that it’s normal in many ways it still takes a toll. I started out wanting to address something that I’m so proud of with Bryan. He has really taken an interest in social media and loves to post both silly things, like I just shaved or cut my nails, to really sweet and meaningful things. In March we were visiting LA and we had dinner with some of our cousins. While waiting for the whole group to arrive, I was sitting on the couch with our cousin Dani. Bryan instantly took a photo of us and wrote “I love these two beautiful ladies.” At that point if he wanted soda or dessert or anything else I might have limited, well he had me. This week my beloved, adored Auntie Barbara or as the kids call her Auntie Bubbe passed away. She was quite ill and on some level we knew this was coming, but she miraculously kept surviving trips to the hospital so I know for me I was in complete denial that this would actually happen. As with the  rest of the family, my boys were heartbroken. They loved Auntie Bubbe with her warm and engaging style. She always greeted them with great interest in whatever was going on with them. Jason’s Bar Mitzvah was a  year ago. She loved to needlepoint and she made Bryan a gorgeous Talit cover for his Bar Mitzvah. She wanted to do the same for Jason; but knowing how ill she was she was afraid she would not be able to or be there for the day. About 2.5 years ago she sent Jason and me to a local needlepoint store that had many Judaica patterns. She asked me to take Jason to pick out what he liked and the sales lady, like any store she frequented, would know Barbara Henschel and would get all of the yarn and things needed to complete the project. I am proud to say Jason thought this was the coolest thing. He took his time and picked out an extremely colorful pattern. He was so interested in the fact that she wanted to do this for him and that he got to make a selection. I am truly happy to report that not only did she complete this masterpiece, she was at his Bar Mitzvah to share in our joy. So of course I got off topic a bit. Bryan was unsure of how to express his grief. He kept telling me he was so sad about Auntie Bubbe. You see she just had this way of making you feel good and special, and he felt it too. She talked to him with respect and warmth, and he responded. He wrote a little note to her saying “rest in peace Auntie Bubbe, I’m so sorry you died” and posted it on Facebook. I was a little nervous that my cousins might not like it or feel it was inappropriate. They did not. They love, like and understand Bryan and they found it heartwarming. They laugh with him and they just embrace all that is Bryan.  They can get frustrated and annoyed by him too but they don’t criticize or judge him in any detrimental way. They support me and my life and let him know that he can just be him. Is there anything better? Unconditional love is never to be taken lightly.

While not a new concept, I am luckily constantly reminded that family is everything. For Shabbat dinner we were gathering at my cousin Ben’s house. It felt like a combo of Shabbat dinner and private Shiva. I had recently come across a letter from my grandfather, our beloved Pop, and decided I would bring it. Anything and everything about him always electrifies us as a family and when Bryan and I arrived I shared it with my cousin. In typical sibling/cousin form, we joked about who had more letters or stuff from my Pop and he busted out a couple of beauties and the emotion filled laughter and tears that is and should be Shiva. When the others arrived we continued this laughing and crying and loving. Bryan was right in the mix. While he was a bit irritable and tired from a long week too, my delicious cousins/more like nieces, were all over him making him feel special and appreciated. We stayed until after dinner but with all things Bryan, we left early. He always has an exit strategy and I have learned to comply. I must admit I was exhausted too from the week and wanted to crawl into bed. I got home and while so so so tired, I could not easily fall asleep. Reflecting on the week and the life and love surrounding us I was weirdly happy. Certainly not happy that she is gone, but happy that she had such a huge impact on my life and her love that is here with me each day.

Debunking and decoding.

The thing about stereotypes is that there is some grain of truth buried beneath a generalization. There are people for whom the stereotype is a perfect fit, probably how it got started in the first place, but for the group described, as a whole, it’s just wrong. There are all kinds of stereotypes for autism. Each person with autism is different, so the stereotypes really don’t fit well. For Bryan I have learned that many of the common ones really aren’t applicable. Does this mean he does not have autism? Does this make him more high functioning than others? Nope. Bryan is not sensitive to loud noises. Last night we had dinner at the Cheesecake Factory with friends. The acoustics in the room we were in were so poor, I found it hard to hear anyone speak and certainly if you had any noise sensitivity you would have struggled greatly. Bryan and his classmate from school were completely un-phased by this noise level. Interesting, but not enough to get me to write a blog.

This past weekend the boys were with their Dad. I had planned to pick them up late afternoon to go to the aforementioned dinner. During the day I had made plans to take my Mom out to brunch and then have her spend some time with me going to Lenscrafters for my eye doctor appointment and shopping at the Boca Mall. If you are a Jewish mother and daughter, going to the mall to shop on a Sunday is as normal as breathing. My mom, however, has Alzheimer’s Disease and the purpose of our outing was not a fun day of shopping and sharing. Instead, I was trying to spend some time with Mom, give my Dad, the primary caretaker, a much needed respite, and to accomplish some tasks while the boys were away. At brunch my Mom was really struggling with eating and at this point we have no substantive conversation. Really, we have no conversation at all. My Mom is/was a very dignified, elegant woman. When she is with me I tell myself to protect her dignity, her long since passed self-esteem. My mom is/was a very proud, stoic person and as her daughter I feel it is my job, my duty in a way, to treat as she would want to be treated if she could take care of herself. It’s not easy, I will tell you that. Wrong, it sucks big time!! In any event, we spent about 3.5 hours together and then I took her back home to my Dad. He is struggling with this situation; it is really a mind fuck. Here is the person you love right in front of you, yet they are not them and are not coming back. Heartbroken is the only word that surfaces.

Ok so I go to pick up the kids. I must admit that although I am always happy to see them after a weekend apart, the very sight of them after this tough time with my Mom is like getting a Carvel sundae. Sweet and delicious, and exactly what you need after a salty meal. When we drive a little I can no longer hold back the tears. I want to shield them from what’s going on yet they are old enough to understand and participate. Jason was up front with me and was his typical loving and caring self. I always battle between showing them the upset, vulnerable, mommy and trying to keep it all in so they won’t worry. No one can hold the damn all of the time. Bryan, however, did not say a word as he was in the back seat focused on our upcoming dinner. After dinner we got home and after a few chores were done Bryan was sitting on the couch perpendicular to me. He said, “Mommy, I’m sorry you’re worried.” I knew exactly what he meant. I know and can decode Bryan. You see, while he doesn’t always say things at the moment, he processes slowly,  it comes out later. I got up and hugged him so tightly. Empathy. Yes, a boy with autism can show empathy. I was literally taken out of my despair and embraced by this small yet enormous milestone. If you have a child and they show empathy, you always feel great. But if you have a child with autism, well, another huge stereotype debunked.

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