Why do you ask?

Years ago my mother and I laughed about saying “Why do you ask?” to people who asked dopey, nosy questions. If you say this, they get a bit tongue tied because their answer should be “because I’m a nosy person”, but of course no one really says that. My mom was extremely private and never liked the feeling of being interrogated (who does?) and was very defensive when it came to the family, especially Bryan. Over the years I have learned to be more tolerant; trying to put this under the heading of  Isn’t it better for someone to ask a nosy question rather than not asking at all?  I still struggle with this one because people can be very thoughtful or thoughtless, but I try to keep in mind that people don’t know how to handle the unfamiliar.questions2

Case in point-Autism questions like, Is he high-functioning? If you know me, you know that’s a tough one, because it’s not like there is a standard scale. Yep, he’s 4.5 on the high-functioning scale. It’s subjective and no one ever wants to say, my kid is low functioning. It hurts, it stings, blah blah blah.  If I said he was low functioning, what would that do for you? I guess it’s better than people saying “I’m sorry” which they can do when you say your kid has autism. What the hell is that about? The first time I heard that one I have to say, I was completely shell shocked and speechless. I am never speechless. However, people don’t know the right protocol unless they have a kid with autism, so they are trying. Take the good with the bad, I tell myself. For me, some days I am patient and understanding, some days not so much. You get it.

Moving on to what’s in my mind, the impetus to blog. Yesterday was Mother’s day. This was the first Mother’s Day without my Mom being with us and the first one since my beloved Auntie Barbara passed away. A double whammy for our family. Recently a new question has come up that makes me want to say “why do you ask?” Every Sunday we have breakfast at my Dad’s club. It is gorgeous and it’s beyond spoiled and each time I remind myself and the kids of our good fortune. So a few weeks ago some woman who knows my folks came over to talk to my Dad and asked how my Mom was doing. She said to him “Does she know you?” and then points to me (literally points) and says , “Does she know you?”Here are the choices for the answer as they play out in my head:

  • Answer in my head:   She has no fucking clue who I am and it sucks lady.
  • Better answer, but not the one I typically give: Sometimes, it’s very difficult emotionally for all of us.
  • Answer I give: On occasion, but not too often anymore.

Any answer is typically met with no response, which is why you want to say, why do you ask? If I say she doesn’t know me, what info is gleaned from that? Sounds mean, but think about it.

I can’t imagine asking this question. Maybe it’s because of Bryan I have heightened sensitivity to weird, nosy questions, or maybe it’s because my mom taught me not to ask nosy questions. I would say this lady was an anomaly but it’s not the case. I am a pretty tough cookie at this point in my life, but people, take a minute to think about stuff!!! Ok so this blog is more of a rant than a blog, but if my purpose is to get something off of my chest and to raise awareness, I think I may be done. Well almost….

Recently I was shopping with my work BFF in Nordstrom; I was buying a gift in the jewelry dept and there were these mantra bracelets. I’m not big on that stuff but she picked one up and said, you have to get this one, it’s so you: “Be true. Be you. Be kind.” Nothing else really matters.  First of all,  the fact that anyone thinks this mantra represents me is enough to make my year, but it was more of something I aspire to be than something I truly am. Of course I bought it and it is a nice little reminder of how I want to be each time I put it on. I am going to be myself at all times, no apologies.  (probably a little scary for those of you who know me well) Accordingly, I offer some suggestions to people when approaching someone who has a kid with autism/a parent with Alzheimer’s/or anyone going through a difficult time/illness with which you are unfamiliar. How about, “how are things going?” How is so and so doing?” and “Can I do anything to help?” That’s it, just kindness.

You can. End of Story.

endofstoryWhile the focus of this blog entry is on Bryan, the title could apply to Bryan, me and basically anyone facing a goal. Bryan is 17 and is an extremely capable young man. I don’t say this flippantly or casually because there is absolutely nothing casual or inadvertent about where he is today.

About 13 or 14 years ago, when we first learned of speech and language delays, among other delays, before we got the big “A” diagnosis, we went to meet a speech therapist who was considered a guru in dealing with “these kids” and our pediatrician arranged an appointment. Bryan and I went and she was a very business like specialist who asked me a bunch of questions about him and his development. For the next hour, no joke, one hour, she sat on the floor with Bryan and played with him, using Sesame Street character figurines and a playset with slides and activities for the figurines. I sat in the room on the chair holding my breath and and trying not to cry or vomit-again, no joke. What would this woman say after this hour? What was she trying to get at? It was all so unfamiliar to me and terrifying. It was not the first, but it was the beginning for sure, of what would become a long road for Bryan, a long road for our family, and a personal journey for me. After the hour she let me know exactly what she thought. I can remember being in my skin at this appointment as if it was an hour ago. She said here’s what I think: “He’s in there. You will need a tremendous amount of therapy over many years. There is no magic pill; you cannot throw money at this to make it go away. You also need to use his strengths when getting him into schools and programs. You are lucky, he is a very handsome and engaging little boy. If you go to a program, take a photo with you, but don’t take him. You don’t want anyone judging him by his behavior at one meeting.” I listened intently as if the Dalai Lama was imparting the key to life to me. Since this was a long time ago and still very distinct, you know this had a huge impression on me. I feel emotional just typing this and remembering how I felt in the car trying to process all of this info. I won’t take you through the timeline because many of you know it, but it was solid, no bullshit type of advice, including the part about how he looks. It was a crash course in “put your big girl pants on lady, because this journey is not for the weak and you better realize in short order that if you don’t get cracking and face up to reality, you’re screwed”. That’s Janespeak for what went down and for the talk I had and continue to have with myself 14 years later. I am quite fortunate, as is Bryan, that his father was always and is always on board with whatever is best for Bryan, and literally has no ego when it comes to him. Men often shy away from these kids and their issues which can make things worse; but that was never the issue. We were and are still of the same mind when it comes to Bryan: You can. End of Story.

It would be so nice to say that Bryan is now a Phd student at Harvard and has outgrown autism and everything is perfect and rosy. That is certainly not the case, nor the goal. However, the goal has always been and will continue to be that if you work hard and set your mind to something, goals are not only achievable but are inevitable. Kudos are offered up to Bryan and his desire to do well, to learn and to please. What the general public cannot or does not understand is that special needs kids work so damn hard at everything and every moment and task is evaluated. “Gee Bryan was great at lunch last week.” Oh yeah, well how was Jason? I know it’s unfair but imagine your life was one big report card. It’s tough. The one thing I do know is that the most important thing we can give to Bryan is his sense of pride, his sense that he can do and be whatever he wants, without regard to a timeline. And for the record, autism still sucks. Yes, I am grateful for the life lessons, yes I am grateful for Bryan growing up in slow motion and still allowing me to kiss him and hold hands in public, and yes I am grateful for the love and support from some of the most unlikely people. The anxiety that Bryan experiences as “his autism” still thwarts some of his progress and still tests even the most patient of people. His impulse control issues and his language delays still impact him and us regularly. While he feels complex emotions which can be learned from his behavior and some language, his expressive self is still highly challenged. So while I suppose I can and do appreciate the progress, the lesson must always stay in the forefront for both of us. You can. End of Story.

 

Love is Love is Love

IMG_0384 (1).JPGI do not make New Year’s Resolutions, I make hourly resolutions. I couldn’t possibly store up all of my potential improvements to force them out in a year end blast. My journey is iterative and I’m forever fine tuning the workload. At this point there is also a collision between resolutions and  bucket list items. Kind of what do I need to do vs. what do I want to do, etc. Good news is it’s my set of lists and I can manage it any way that fits. So although I do not make New Year’s Resolutions, I do try to take a pause to appreciate my life and the people in it at this time of year. So this  year I am going to focus on love. When I watched Lin-Manuel Miranda give his Tony speech right after the Orlando shooting, he said “love is love is love….” in reference to the respect for the people who are homosexual and were victimized by the gunman. It is a great reminder and his speech really touched me. It was a rough, emotion-filled speech/sonnet fueled by his need to acknowledge the Tony he was receiving  and yet his compulsion, his pure heart, that couldn’t pass up the forum to comment on the most recent tragedy. Something about his delivery, his body language really struck me; this man feels his words, he just doesn’t say them. It was almost as if he was holding back the words but they had to escape from his brain via his mouth. Do I have that much passion about anything? Hmm, kids maybe. I actually think my main passion at this point in my life is to try. I just want to try at being better at everything. The only way for me to achieve this is to work on what is most important, the priority, my love relationships; to which I am proud to say I have plenty. So here are some of the ones that are most precious to me and my recognition for their significance in my life and my desire to enhance them.

Sibling Love: If you have a sibling and you are lucky enough to love them and feel love in return, you get it. This person who shares the unique joint perspective of growing up in the same home and watching parents and family members influence your development, there is such a crazy bond that a quick glance over dinner can say it all. I am proud to say that the shitty relationship my sister and I had growing up, the constant fighting and comparisons have been left in our childhood home and the mutual respect and fun we share now makes up for it all. Sharing the burden of our aging parents has solidified the bond even more. Fortunately we understand our individual and collective roles in the process. My sister, luckily, like me, finds humor in the humorless. We could write a book with optional titles such as “laughing at your life when you should be crying”, “Things you never thought you would hear or should hear coming from one of your parent’s mouths”, and “Who am I and how did I get here?” As far as sibling love goes, I cannot even do justice to the sibling love between my boys. They adore each other; their relationship is very complicated, yet not. Bryan may be older by 2 years and 8 months, but chronology is not a significant player in their situation. Jason has always been a very caring and loving brother. Often other people remark about how good he is with Bryan, how helpful he is, etc.  To Jason, Bryan is just Bryan, his one and only sibling, and there since his birth. I would not say I take it for granted, because that would be untrue, but if you truly know Jason at all, it’s just who he is. His level of empathy and compassion for people, not just Bryan,  is just as much a signature trait of his, as autism is for Bryan. It’s hard coded in and that’s that. And like all sibling relationships there is ebb and flow in their bond and growing pains both literally and figuratively.

Parental Love: So you know the love I feel from my mom has changed dramatically over the last few years. I no longer have the ability to call her multiple times each day just to share something funny or get some advice. I no longer have that confidant who always had my back and thought I was the jammy jam. My mom was so reasonable and so thoughtful in her advice and she had many close long term friends who also feel the void. In later years she really helped me navigate tricky waters between my dad and my ex husband and ultimately was very supportive when I began to speak with her about my ailing marriage. She was a homemaker and not a career woman in any way and we talked about how different our lives  were and we agreed we each were programmed so differently that we could not walk each other’s path through life. My mother respected me as a woman, mother and business person. What propels me now when I see her is this need to be even better because I don’t have her to talk to. I want to show her, or really me, that I can be a “big girl” and handle things. In order for me to move forward I need to have personal goals; some very tangible and achievable and some more esoteric which manifest on the fly. Either way, I want my Mom’s legacy, for me, to be that I am that girl she loved and respected. I need to earn my way. With my Dad it’s become such an interesting change. I was always daddy’s girl and he looked at me with love and pride since childhood. Over the years there have been tons of bumps and bruises but now we are on a steady course, banded together over decisions for my mom  and forging ahead with his new and uncertain life.

Mommy love: Is there anything so great? Before you have a kid you hear about this gripping bond people feel for their children. You think it must be something special but you cannot truly conceive of it. The little angel appears and you think, “oh so this is what they were talking about!!!” Take my heart, melt it over and over again. And then when it was time for another, you think can I really love another one just as much? Yep you can and you do. My boys are my joy, my focus, my reason, my why. Their triumphs are mine and their challenges, well yep get those too. ‘Nuf said.

Bryan/Autism love: The kid knows how to work the fan club. He is a one man PR specialist for autism awareness. He loves to love and reaches out on a daily basis to friends, family, teachers, therapists, counselors, etc via facebook, facetime etc. I am truly fascinated and beyond appreciative of the warm reception he receives most of the time. Whenever talking to the recipient of these daily calls, etc. they feel special, as if contact from him is directed only at them. Who does not want to talk to someone who makes them feel special? Autism, however, is still so challenging, imagine having someone in your home who literally cannot stop talking or repeating and at the same time is so anxious the minute they sense you are not happy with them and what they are talking about. It’s the ultimate test for Jason and me on a daily basis. But somehow Bryan’s sweet goofiness, his silly inappropriate behavior more often than not forces a chuckle between us and we forge ahead. When meeting my cousins a few days ago for lunch,  I was so happy with the way they celebrated his silliness and made him feel just like he was “one of the kids”. We have tons of friends near and far that are cheering for him. No real words suffice.

Friend love: I am truly beyond lucky to have wonderful lifelong friends. My bestie  is a lifer and she is my touchstone for all things. My close inner circle of female friends are a combo of coaches, partners in crime and sisters from other misters. My close friends are not limited to women, however, I have some incomparable male friends that I adore. Some of my friends live nearby but often they are in NY, solidifying my need for quarterly visits up north. Over my years in Florida, I have made many new friends that have started out either as “autism parents” that morphed into real friends or “work colleagues” that have also become warm, true friends. What I value besides the loyalty and trustworthiness of my friends is the variety. Some friends are more advice givers, some are more just buddies for happy hour. Either way, I love observing human nature and understanding the different dynamics.  I am a very social person and I enjoy hearing other’s life stories. At this point in my life we have all lived a while and no one is without some sort of challenge, lesson, or funny anecdote which I find very captivating.

Cousins/extended family love: If you know me personally, you know my cousins are not cousins they are brothers/sisters, nephews and nieces. One of the main attractions for living in Florida was the proximity to this crazy clan and you just have to see my face when I’m with them. The depth of these relationships is personified through unending teasing, laughter and appreciation. If you go to one of our events and you left your thick skin home, well sorry Charlie, you are screwed. The need to laugh at yourself through the eyes of those you love is a great lesson. It is so freeing to know you can be yourself with a large group of people who will take you down and build you up inside of any group gathering. The link between us and our kids is one of the best parts of my life and although I tell them all of the time how much I love them, they know just by my body language displayed at any event.

Pet love: This one should be quick. Furry creatures make me happy. A curl up on the couch with a yummy dog or cat is therapeutic and warm. I love my animals, they are family and they make our lives better.

Romantic love: It is always a necessary part of life for me. I am a very affectionate person and I would like to say I have fallen in love since my divorce. I have not. I have fallen in like once or twice which is electrifying!  I have found some connections and have had fun along the way. I have learned that I am still capable of having great romantic feelings and that feels awesome. I believe real love is out there for me and I will not settle or fail to take risks to find it. No pain, no gain. Simple but true. I am totally willing to be in the game for the better of team me.

Happy 2017!

 

Crank it up!

Science question: You’re driving and you have the music on; something good and loud, like the Who, We Don’t Get Fooled Again, what is the decibel level required to drown out the voices in your head? This is not rhetorical people; I need the info. Over the last week so many f-ed up things have occurred that I truly believe only a heartfelt, drug inspired 70’s real rock song could block out the noise. You know something you can crank up and sing because you know all of the words and although you know your voice stinks, it completely doesn’t matter. It also doesn’t matter that your windows are down and sunroof is open, you need to let it out. Feel free to substitute any song you like; I just happen to love the Who and the righteous, guttural way Roger Daltrey belts them out. I always see him in my mind’s eye as Tommy  in those jeans and shirtless, with the long curls,  singing his heart out(just to me of course) and well, that definitely helps get the adrenaline flowing. tommySo….please feel free to email me, text me, IM, twitter, instagram, snap chat, call or snail mail me the answer. I need it. You see I drove to work this morning and no matter how loud I made it and how loud I sang, no dice. Still couldn’t block out the noise in my head. You know something is pretty messed up when your kid says, “you probably shouldn’t blog about this one if you know what I mean”. I do. The actual event or events are not always the hardest part to fathom, but the processing, the clean up of the carnage, well that’s where the real work gets done. The carnage here was bloody and messy and no amount of mopping seemed to do the trick.

It’s  fair to say that you really can’t control most things that happen in your life. As those of us know who have been through therapy and/or are introspective in any way, you know that you can only control your own responses to what happens in life and choose the way you want to handle the damage control. These things are always easier said than done, and emotions have a way of clouding judgment.  What happens when things are unfolding before you and you think to yourself, um, why is this happening and now what the hell am I going to do? How does this get corrected? When things occur and the boys are impacted, I feel like I want to shout out “cut, let’s try this one again”.  When things are going on right in front of you and you are processing them it is not easy to step outside of yourself and say, “hmm, how am I going to handle this situation so my children are not damaged, hurt or angry.” These questions are rhetorical. I was meeting with some folks from my Leadership Broward group yesterday (#LB35 #highfive) and one of the team members is gay and he was discussing the parenting classes he and his husband have to take to adopt a child. Parenting classes? What is this thing you speak of my friend? My mind wandered to a place where I thought, shouldn’t basic parenting classes be required for everyone? Shouldn’t basic human decency classes exist? I guess those things are left up to your parents if you have kids the old fashioned way. In light of the events of my weekend, I was definitely more focused on this topic than I typically would have been. Maybe my personal sensitivity to the challenges of parenting this weekend cast a brighter light on our conversation.

It is my opinion that success, in any form, is not only the result of hard work and a little luck but overcoming some obstacle or plowing through some roadblock. People who have it too easy have nothing to grind against, nothing to strive for that requires the type of deep soul searching and tenacity that propels a breakthrough. I feel this way about innovation and technology, the problem solving aspect, but also the resolve. If I didn’t have autism in my life, I would not have learned what I am capable of. I love when people tell me how much patience I have. I think, “are you talking about me?” I spent the first half of my life so impatient and wound up. I do have a lot of patience now, but it didn’t come from anything natural, it came from survival and for the sheer need and desire to be the parent Bryan needed me to be. How could I face my beautiful boy if I couldn’t be kind and patient with him? (Believe me I have fallen off that wagon a million times, and many of you out there have witnessed it).  Autism is a disorder not a behavior. Would you lose patience if your kid was puking, well maybe that’s a bad example, but you know what I mean. An invisible disorder is still a disorder and needs to be treated accordingly.  I’m still a work in progress, for sure. So by now you may be wondering, why are we talking about success and overcoming obstacles when we were just talking about cleaning up an emotional mess?  The thing I guess I’m grappling with is how much is ok for our kids to have to deal with? How much shielding is good, how much is overprotective? Where are the lines drawn and who has the damn manual? Can I get it on my kindle? These questions in my head just beg for seriously loud music.

 

Choose your mindset, yep I know I have used that title before.

IMG_2951Some things resonate. A few years ago I wrote  a blog post about a speaker I heard say to “choose your mindset”. It gripped me then, and clearly, still has me now. The language we speak to ourselves, the things we tell ourselves matter. If you are not good at something and keep reminding yourself you are not good at it, well you are just reinforcing that bad behavior. You have a choice. Tell yourself you’re a fuck up or tell yourself, wow I just learned something and now I won’t do this again. I am evolving! I am a study of all things behavior and people, particularly myself and my kids. I have always been introspective. I hold myself to a very high standard of treat people how you want to be treated. This summer has challenged me in so many ways, and the mindset I have chosen is “I got this”. I am stumbling here and there for sure, but the focus, the way I speak to myself is positive and empowering.

If I have to trace this feeling back to anything, it is Bryan. If you tell someone you have a child with autism, you often get, “I’m sorry”. Damn cuz that hurts. It is easy to fall into the space of why did this happen to me or my kid. To build up the positive muscle of embracing the journey, you have to work it out. You have to keep pushing it and pushing it. No quick fixes on that one. And you fall of the wagon for sure, like when someone says, do you think Bryan will drive soon? Or do you think  he will be able to have  a job? One big lesson is to remind myself that no matter what anyone asks, they are typically inexperienced in this world and just don’t know what to say. I love the saying that you need to love the child you have, not the one you expected. Great lesson, not just for parents of special needs kids; this applies to all parents. But if you know me, you know that saying nothing to me or ignoring me doesn’t work well for me. Ignoring something or someone because addressing it or them makes you uncomfortable is immature. If you want to show someone you care, show them, take action, address the topic. No one expects anyone to have answers, but empathy is always welcome.

I had a huge reality check on this one recently. My mom has Alzheimer’s and has been declining rapidly. On two occasions recently she did not who I was. To tell you that was devastating is a colossal understatement. My dad is the major caretaker and is sad, overwhelmed and frazzled. When my sister and I call and he tells us some things that have occurred I find myself saying dopey things that I would hate if someone said to me about Bryan. A lesson for me to once again be gracious for those that ask about him and recognize that when you don’t have experience with something, it is challenging to help someone. I remind myself that these people are at least saying something and not ignoring it. At least they want to try and help. My dad gets very upset and says to us “you have no idea” when we ask how things are. So I decided to change my mindset and ask him, “Dad, what can I say to you when you say this?”. The answer is fantastic and the same answer I always want to hear: “just tell me that you love me”.

A letter to me.

You know all of the clichés; hindsight is 20/20, can’t look back, learn from your mistakes. I get it, no one knows what they don’t know, but it would be so great if you could just go back in time for some basic life lessons. April is Autism Awareness Month, so it’s always time to think about where we are on the journey now, as compared to when we first busted out our compass and started trekking forward. So what would I say to my younger self, the newish mom, absorbing and coping with all things PDD (Pervasive Developmental Disorder), then Autism? I think it would be pretty basic, but as most of us know the good stuff is always fairly obvious.

  • Listen with your heart. Sooo easy to get caught up in what others tell you. “you should try this” or “my kid did that”. Every kid on the spectrum is so different and most of these kids, particularly Bryan, have language deficits and cannot tell you exactly what they need or feel. Trust your mommy gut, feel your way through, it won’t let you down. If you know in your heart something is good or bad for your kid, go with it. My heart never lets me down.
  • Don’t judge. This is probably one of the biggest lessons I have learned. When you see a family struggling with their kid or if you see a kid acting up, don’t judge. I realize now that so many people have all kinds of personal struggles and each person copes differently. Just because it’s not my way, doesn’t mean I should judge that person. I have not walked in their shoes and vice versa.
  • Be open. Be open to new people, new things happening, new ideas. Be open to other treatments and therapies besides established medical protocols. I revered doctors growing up, and still do, mostly, but I learned that I am a smart person and just because you went to medical school doesn’t mean you know all. One little side note: if something looks like it’s too good to be true, it usually is…
  • Always show respect. When dealing with teachers, doctors, therapists, show them respect for their perspective, expertise,  and time. The old expression, you get more with honey than vinegar, rings true here. Each of these people interact with your kid in a different way and have different life and professional experiences. You don’t have to agree, you don’t have to take your kid back to that person, but even the  negative experiences have left me with some little nugget of learning. A very close doctor friend of mine told me a long time ago to see lots of different doctors. Each see different patients and you never know when something may trigger a reference or an idea for you. Autism is not black and white so things are always changing. You have to change with it and keep getting more info.
  • Slow down. I spent my younger years concerned with reaching goals. I still set and like to reach goals but with Bryan and with my adult self I realize the journey, the process, the pace, can be as important as the goal itself. I’ve said many times that raising a child with autism is like raising a child in slow motion. Things that typical kids achieve at a certain age don’t go that way. I have clichés for this too, it’s a marathon, not a sprint, but there is truth here. You need to make peace with the idea that your kid may not do things “on time” or at all, but either way, take a deep breath and enjoy him.
  • Acknowledge progress. Great story from yesterday. Perhaps this is what got me to blog anyway. I took the boys out to lunch with my mom and sister. Nothing swanky, just Toojays (deli/diner in SOFL). We have done this many times. Bryan was antsy in his chair and hungry and just a little off. Lunch was tense and then we left. Jason took Bryan swimming and all seemed a bit better. Around 4:30 Bryan was very agitated and hurt Jason. Bryan likes to dig his nails into us, clearly a sensory thing, and broke the skin on Jason’s hand. Here is where the good stuff happens. It was a little early for Bryan’s night meds but we encouraged him to take them. He did but I have learned that if he thinks you can get over his bad behavior, if you can acknowledge that something bad happened but you can move forward, he can calm himself down. I told him, “everyone has a bad moment. You now need to get over it and calm down.” I have also find that if I get even nicer, warmer, sweeter, he will calm down. If I get angry or upset, there will be a colossal melt down.Hmm, so am I acknowledging his progress or mine?? In any event, my younger self could’ve used this advice, although I have to say sometimes this is way easier said than done.
  • Open up. My parents are/were very private. Too private if you ask me. I learned that sharing with others helps others to share with you. Parents are the best resource for autism and by sharing my experiences I have had others share their experiences with me. Priceless, awesome, fantastic!!!  If you are an autism parent you will know that there is truly nothing better than another parent telling you the real deal on a therapy, treatment, school, etc. On Saturday I took Bryan to Golf Buddies. I started chatting with another Mom who I have known for years, but have not known well at all. I have watched her daughter at all of the buddy sports and she has seen Bryan. We talked nonstop for the entire hour. We tackled major issues, marriage and divorce, school, housing for our kids, etc. The hour flew by and when I left her I had that feeling of community, the feeling of “wow that lady is my peeps” kind of feeling. The warmth of that hour really inspired me to think about how truly lucky I am to have Bryan and all that goes along with him.

 

Autism Awareness

One of the great things about autism, and there are many great things, is the way other parents respond to your kid and the way you respond to their kid with autism. This week one of the families we know posted a photo on facebook of their son starting an internship at Sports Authority. I see this family every weekend and to see this photo of their son working in the community, understanding what a huge milestones this is, well you get the vicarious sensation of pride. I took Bryan to music class this morning and met a mom who has a 6 year old son with autism. She is working on a website for autism awareness and our friend and coordinator of the Parkland Buddy’s Sports program introduced us. We sat together and chatted for a few minutes. Her son was friendly and came over and said hi. Bryan was singing on the microphone, summoned me to come over and he put his arm around me while he sang. When I got back to my seat I told her how lucky I feel sometimes that autism gives you the luxury of having the kids grow up in slow motion. At almost 14 I am not “embarrassing” to Bryan (as far as I know) and he is warm and loving. She agreed and told me she wouldn’t trade it for anything. Amen. I have had that conversation with many Moms and the lessons learned from autism far outweigh it’s challenges. But, to get back to the point here, we were at soccer today, and one of the coaches, who is also a great friend, asked if we thought it would be ok to move Bryan up to the field with the kids that really play a game. You see, Bryan has typically been on the field but only with kids that are running back and forth and kicking, not actually playing. There is nothing wrong with where he was, but to me, the fact that the coach, another parent of a boy with autism, and friend, is taking notice of the maturity of our boy, well that just fills my heart. Reach for the stars Bryan, because you can catch one. He and his buddy went to the field and he did really well. While not scoring or dazzling anyone, he more importantly got the concept of the game and was able to hack it. The other parents that we sit with were incredibly supportive too. We all want our kids to make progress, to prove to us and the world that there are truly no limits on their capabilities. The Parkland Buddy Sports tag line is “No Limits” and today, more than any other day, it rang true to me.
During the game today I happened to chat with a buddy I didn’t know. He was waiting for my friend and her son to use the rest room, and he and I started to make small talk. He is a high school student and told me this was his 6th year as a buddy. I pointed at Bryan and said that’s my son, and he said “oh I know Bryan”. He explained how much he has learned from the program and how much he really enjoys the kids, their families and being part of something so special. He also told me he knew Jason. He said Jason told me he can be a buddy because he’s “basically a buddy all of the time”. I told Jason this a long time ago and I guess it stuck. The boy, whose name is Bradley, went on to tell me about how he watches the kids change and grow and he likes to see how they learn. You see it’s everywhere this autism awareness thing.

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