Always two there are, no more no less. A master and an apprentice.

So I’m quoting Yoda. Does that make me a Star Wars geek? I guess maybe, but I’m really not, I just dig his quirky  little backward way of talking and his intonation. His sayings are clever and provocative. They make you smile just as you say them.  Star Wars has  a significant place in pop culture and I can respect that, for sure.yoda

I am forever the apprentice, never the master, particularly as it relates to Bryan. Recently I had a conversation with a case worker that assists in navigating benefits at work. This man is an Occupational Therapist by education and practice, but he is also a trusted advisor to me. I have been speaking with this man, approximately 2-3 times per year for the last 7 years. He knows all about Bryan, his challenges, his needs and his progress. Another example, for sure, that it truly takes a village to raise a kid with autism. So this man helps me to navigate the available benefits and based on our discussions and his probing, we talk about what Bryan may or may not need for the upcoming year and he translates that into credible recommendations for assistance. One of the benefits of this benefit (ha!) is that this man really tries to understand who Bryan is, although they have not and will not meet, and tries to understand my philosophy in parenting Bryan. He can gauge progress by asking pointed questions the answers which reveal  growth or deficiencies. He forces me to not only think about what we are focusing on now, but the 3-5 year look ahead. Both are necessary and practical, yet stir emotions. Bryan will be 17 this month (there must be a math error) and it’s exciting to see what he can do now and where he can go. So I was describing to this man all of the independent functioning Bryan is doing and all of the great things he can do at home, at school etc. However, and this is the great part, there is always more. Always more to be done, always more to implement, always more to learn. He made two great suggestions. He knows Bryan is very visual, as are many kids on the spectrum, and I told him that Bryan likes a written schedule and also loves his phone and ipad. He suggested we add all of his plans on a google calendar. Duh, I use it all of the time, why didn’t I think of that??? Bryan will love that. So easy, so simple, yet so smart.

Another thing he and I talked about was Bryan’s use of money. At school he has personal finance aka math and he loves it. My caseworker suggested getting Bryan a prepaid debit card so he could pay for things and learn how to use the debit/credit machines. Another fantastic idea, all geared toward independence. My most favorite thing about talking to people who work with or are parents of kids on the spectrum are just these little tidbits we can share. It’s never the big things; we don’t miss those, but those small incremental wins are so fruitful. The student, grasshopper, apprentice in me is awakened by these suggestions and now I’m focused again on the possibilities. Bryan came home from school a few weeks ago and told me he is now going to FAU on Thursdays, “with the big kids”. He was very proud of himself and I knew based on his sense of urgency that the school told  him to make sure he told me. It’s not the rate of progress that matters, only the direction. So much behind us, yet so far ahead. Two weeks we went to Disney, a request by Bryan in celebration of his upcoming birthday. I like Disney but have been there many many times (incidental benefit of Florida residency) and he used to have tremendous anxiety there, even though he loves it. He was not anxious at all. He was over the moon. Jason and I shared a few quick “look how happy he is” moments when observing Bryan. So we decided to go on the Speedway at the Magic Kingdom. You know, those seriously old cars on a metal track. Jason went on his own and I went with Bryan. In my head I really wanted to see how he could navigate the car. He was fine with the driving part, as I knew he would be, but he was so distracted by people; nope not ready for real driving  yet. Years ago I would have panicked that this means he won’t be able to drive. Now I know it just means he will not be driving anytime soon because he’s not mature enough to focus on the road without the distractions. Bryan’s sheer presence reminds me that there is always plenty to learn if you are willing to be a student.

 

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