Go Team!

img_0241The similarities between the approach I’ve taken to Alzheimer’s and my mom to Autism and Bryan are becoming more obvious. It’s interesting to me how much one good methodology can be applied to multiple situations. For years I have been saying that you need to harness the collective when it comes to raising a child with autism. As the mom of one of these kids, you need to realize you are the quarterback of an amazing team of people, family, therapists,friends and other parents. These people each have their individual skills, but getting them to work together, in the way that works best for your kid, you need to have a sense of both the near and far. You need to call the plays because at the end of the day, you know your kid better than anyone. Over the years we have adjusted the playbook, taken on some new players, and retired a few for the best interest of team Bryan.

My mom’s placement in the Alzheimer’s home came as a team effort too. We did our research but in the end the recommendation came from a friend whose father had been there. She is a warm and trustworthy person so we knew we were in good hands. The adjustment has been difficult for all of us; however she seems much better so that is what counts. My dad has been going to the support groups that the home sponsors. He is learning to share with others how he is feeling about my mom’s placement and learning  that by hearing other family’s stories and their pain, he will not only feel a sense of comradeship but will also get some relief. There is a safety, a warmth in belonging to a group. Identifying with those similarly situated is incredibly uplifting. I have noticed when I go to see my mom that  I see the same family members and we have started to know each other. We all say hello and have empathy for our mutual plight. Today I got to the home about 10:30 and two of the family members were in the entry way. They were telling me that they had seen my mom and how sweet and cute she is. I told one lady that yesterday her husband said hello to me and gave me a big smile. I walked in having that familiar feeling of community. While I know my mom will not get better, and that is always lurking in my psyche, I do know she is doing as well as can be expected. The boys feel it too. Last weekend I took the boys to see her after we had breakfast with my dad and sister, our new Sunday morning ritual. My dad is terribly lonesome and the early mornings when he is alone in his house typically sting. Usually when we walk out of my mom’s place I get about two steps from the front door and start to sob. I am ok when I see her, but leaving her in a place that is not her home is quite disturbing. The boys had been very affectionate with her that day and I didn’t feel so sad when we walked out. Jason turned to me and said “Mom, you’re doing so much better with Grandma”. Ok well so much for doing better because his tenderness made me sob in a different way. I knew they were impacted by emotions, but had not felt it so directly. We are experiencing this change all together and learning how to support each other, go team!